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. may each of us share in the gifts of strength and peace that senator kennedy found as he came here to pray, especially at the altar of our mother of per petal health -- per petal health. >> my dear friends, a few miles from here the city on the hill stands. in the sea toward nantucket, it's a bit more forlorn at the loss of one of its most ardent lovers. in welcoming you to the mass, the resurrection, to commemorate of life of senator kennedy, i'm sure i speak for everyone in expressing our sincerest sympathies to all the kennedy family, but especially to the senator's wife to his sons teddy and patrick and his daughter kara and to his sister jean. we share your sadness as we shared your love and your pride for your husband and father and brother and friend. in the church's liturgy of the eucharist, sadness with hope, sheer vanished in the faith in the love and compassion in the christ our lord who through his own death and resurrection has overcome death. and so as a believing community, let us now pray. almighty god, our father, it is our christian faith that your son died and ro
. to make real the dream of our family. he was given the gift of time that his brothers were not and he used that gift to touch as many lives an write as many wrongs as the years would allow. we can still hear his voice bellowing through the senate chamber, a convertible force of nature in support of healthcare, or workers rights or civil rights. and yet, as has been noted, while his causes became deeply personal, his disagreements never did. while he was seen by his fiercest critics as a partisan lightning rod, that is not the prism through which ted kennedy saw the world, nor was it the prism through which his colleagues saw ted kennedy. he was a product of an age when the joy and nobility of politics prefshlted differences of party -- prevented differences of party from becoming barriers of cooperation and mutual respect. a time when adversaries still saw each other as patriots. atest legislature of our time. he did it by huing the principle, yes, but also by seeking compromise and common cause. not through deal making and horse trading alone, but through friendship and kindness and humor
for the rule of law and if the security of our mexican people forces us to stop the traffic of weapons and money that goes from north to south againwith these organized crime groups. the exchange of information and the building of our institutions is needed for our cooperation. it is an international crisis that we face. the north american region has to take the leadership in taking necessary measures to recover our economic growth. in our task we have set to implement cyclical measures that have been put into action. and according manner we can stabilize our economy and bring about trustworthiness in regard to the future of the global economy. it is necessary to build our financial international institutions. the international monetary fund, which is fundamental to guarantee financial resources in the case of latin america. the support that will be a enabe us. commitment in regard to the poor countries in the regent of the north american countries, certain that at the next g-20 meeting that shall take place in pittsburg, united states will be a great opportunity to build the necessary
in the ronald reagan building. it will consist of four tracks focusing on using that for innovation and management. for our government. keeping the initiatives from the administration. stay tuned to our website for that information. tomorrow, tomorrow was very exciting. we'll be talking about innovation. contests. crowd forcing. all the fun things -- >> this event is wrapping up with housekeeping. tonight, an in-depth look at medicare, part 8. our guest is the former administrator for medicare and medicaid. that is tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern. >> as the debate over health care continues, our health care how does an online resource. -- our health care website is a resource, including video from town hall meetings you have gone too. and there is more at c- span.org/healthcare. >> flags are flying at half staff today. senator ted kennedy passed away last night. president obama singing this morning that the massachusetts's senator's ideas are stamped on scores of laws and reflected in millions of lives. >> sustained by remember priceless years together, i will try to carry for that spe
stone." he seems like a really great person. >> can you show us your dog tag? oh, maybe not. >> it is under this tie and shirt. i cannot do it right now. [laughter] i have a special one that my family "for christmas a couple of years ago. i wear that. these are also very special. i see these at the shows and i see people wearing them. they come up and show me that they have supported the cause. they are either diabetic or they're hoping to raise awareness and that means a lot to me. >> how do you keep going when you were feeling down? >> knowing that there are people out there who have been encouraged or inspired by my story and if there is a moment where i am frustrated with my struggle with diabetes, i look forward to that moment and know that is coming and that makes it work. >> where do you get inspiration for your songs, the -- besides the diabetes? >> i tried to pull inspiration from a ribbon around us, relationships, personal things try to make it real to who we are. >> this comes from caroline, who has been a diabetic for 13 years. she says she has been a diabetic fo
as his colleague. i admit, i used to hang on to his t shirt and his coat sleeve on the capitol when i was just a little boy. so when i got a chance to serve with him on capitol hill, all i needed to do was set my compass to the principles of his life. my father and i were the primary sponsors of the mental health parity and addiction equity act which was signed into law last year. this bill represented not only a legal victory for 54 million americans with mental illness who were being denied equal health insurance, but as one of those 54 million americans, i felt he was also fighting for me to help ease the burden of stigma and shame that accompanies treatment. i will really miss working with dad. i will miss my dad's wonderful sense of self-dep kating humor. when the far right made dad their poster child for their attack ads, he used to say, we kennedy sure bring out the best in people. and when he first got elected and my cousin joe was a member of congress, and i came to congress, dad finally celebrated saying, finally, after all these years, when someone says who does that damned
issues. >> thank you for inviting us to have this hearing. we are delighted to participate. virtually our entire economy, our defense system, depends on the electronic medication systems that are extremely vulnerable and under constant attack. the vast majority of the systems are owned and operated by the private sector. unfortunately, virtually all the economic incentives regarding cyber security favor the attackers. the area to defend is virtually a -- limitless. defense is difficult to coordinate an expensive compared to the return on investment. the good news is that we know a great deal about how to prevent and stop these attacks. the bad news is, we are just not doing it. price waterhouse coopers study of over 1000 companies found that those who follow the industry best practices could prevent almost -- and almost entirely mitigate the attacks against him. the 2008 date of age in the database breach report studied and concluded that 87% of the bridges could of been avoided if reasonable and identifiable security practices had been followed. the chief of intermission assurance for th
of stories. >> thanks for joining us. now that speech on british domestic policy by david cameron. his remarks are from earlier this summer at imperial college in london. [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and for your kind words about the need for honesty, openness, and transparency about public spending, something the prime minister and i the skull -- discussed in a slightly less calm and mysterious they. i want to thank imperial college for inviting me to speak here. you do have a remarkable history. these innovations have put willpower into people's hands and have changed the world. i want to talk about people power and the change we need in this country. after the political crisis this year, the consensus for change is overwhelming, but the reality so far has been, let's be frank, underwhelming. the announcement of a behind the doors iraq inquiry, and a prime minister who has talked about restoring the authority of parliament but is still going around making announcements on the radio. if you are serious about change, you need a consistency of argument and a c
in treatment and a lot of the advances in pharmaceuticals, come from the u.s. paying so much money, and if the u.s. creates a new system, how is it that those types of extremely advanced pharmaceutical development to get paid for? how do the canadian citizens pay for it when they go to the mikheil clinic, for instance? i think the states might be better this -- when they go to the mayo clinic, for instance? the cutting edge of medicine, how will that get paid for? >> well, i agree that u.s. institutions in the united states that are top notch, that are the top of the world, the mayo clinic and some of them, and you need to keep that, because it is very important research, and you are doing some things that we are not doing in canada, but if the canadian citizens want to go to the mayo clinic, they have to pay out of their pockets to do that because it is not covered, or, at least, the park that would be covered is very small compared to the real cost, so people are paying out of their pockets if they want to have that, he but these are four very specific things that could not be do
. there is however a need for consistency and rigor and the use of award fee. we should incentivize the contractor performance excellence. i fully support the recommendation that we establish an evaluation factors. definitions of performance, associated fees, and infatuation scales that motivate performance and prohibited fees for unsatisfactory performance. it is effectively using these contras to incentivize excellent contract performance. it is in line with the guidance in december 2007. we will strengthen that policy by issuing amplifying guidance that addresses the concerns raised byjao and recognizes that our major programs, all board, and the requirements need to be tailored to their different mission portfolios and contract objectives. specifically, we will is expected guidance in choosing the right contract time, determine ratings and other categories, and the fee paid for meeting the standards. and ensure that the fee is not pay for unsatisfactory performance. we are committed to working with any interagency group to establish how best to what i weighed this is a tool for improving contr
're going to take you to a discussion on a survey on teenage drug use. that is the former health and human services secretary. a new study is out on teenage drug and alcohol use. >> better able to help our nation's teens grow up drug free. we regard this as a work in progress, as we try each year to improve our ability to identify the situations and characteristics that influence a risk that teens will smoke, drink, get drunk, using illegal drugs, or of the use prescription drugs. we do not ask whether the teens do this. a number of government surveys conduct such studies of substance abuse. rather, the survey asked questions such as, how many teens friends smoke, drink, or use drugs? or at what percentage of parties but teens and 10's are alcohol and illegal and prescription drugs used. over the past 15 years, we have surveyed thousands of american teens and their parents. we have identified a number of circumstances and characteristics that affected teens risk of smoking, drinking, and using drugs. we have learned how such things as stress, boredom, spending money, parties, hanging out o
and getting hired by contractors, who were being sold back to us by the contractor because we still had needs that over the skill-set that the government employee had. . employee would not grant a for an employee who resigned from the agency for a period of 12 months. that's not retired from the agency. if you put enough years in the agency to be eligible for retirement i said, god bless you, you've put your time on, you can move on. but for resignations, the one tool we had was the clearance process and we simply said if you left here, resigned in the last 12 months you're not getting a clearance. i did not want to become the triple-a farm team for a bunch of organizations around the beltway and provide them trained personnel to sell back to us. that too is government efficiency and it doesn't say anything about the contractors. >> right, right, so basically you were losing all these people that were coming back and had to pay for them. >> yeah. >> jack, in the old days this idea of retiring from the c.i.a. and going back and working for them was, i believe, called double dipping, right? it
look at the american flag on the u.s. capitol, above the senate chamber, in tribute to senator kennedy, who died last night after a yearlong battle with brain cancer. president obama marker -- remarked this morning about senator kennedy. >> i wanted to say a few words this morning about the passing of an extraordinary leader, senator edward kennedy. over the past few years i have had the honor to call him a colleague, counselor, and friend. even though we knew that this they was coming for some time, we waited it with no small amount of dred. since his diagnosis last year, we have seen the courage with which he battles his illness. these months have led him here, people from every corner of our nation and around the world, showing how much he meant to all of us. despite the opportunities that we were denied when his brothers were taken from us. we were given the blessing of time to say thank you and goodbye. the outpouring of love, gratitude, the fund memories to which we have all borne witness, a way in which this singular figure in american history have touched our lives. these ideal
-628-0205. you can reach us on twitter, twitter.com/c-spanwj. you can also reach us by e-mail, journal@c-span.org. if you call in, make sure that you turn down your television or radio so that you do not feed back. we will start with the front page of "the wall street journal." "taliban is now winning." this is the report from peter spiegel in washington. "the commander, general stanley mcchrystal, has offered a preview of the strategic assessment that he is going to deliver to washington later this month, saying that the troop shifts are designed to better protect the afghanistan civilians from rising levels of taliban violence and intimidation. the coming redeployments are the clearest manifestation on the death toll and spike in military deaths in afghanistan." we will look at that chart this morning, the mounting toll of the u.s. troop casualties in afghanistan. another article this morning from the philadelphia -- "philadelphia inquirer." de "the president's national security adviser did not rule out adding more u.s. forces in afghanistan to help turn around a war that he said yes
potential for the future. to all those who are idle in the cities and industries of america let us provide new hope for the dignity of useful work. democrats have always believed that a basic civil right of all americans is their right to earn their own way. the party of the people must always be the party of full employment. [applause] . [applause] to all those who work hard for a living wage let us provide new hope that the price of their employment shall not be an unsafe workplace and a death at an earlier age. to all those who inhabit our land from california to the new york island, from the redwood forest to the gulfstream waters, let us provide new hope that prosperity shall not be purchased by poisoning the air, the rivers and the natural resources that are the greatest gift of this continent. [applause] we must insist that our children and our grandchildren shall inherit a land which they can truly call america the beautiful. [applause] to all those who see the worth of their work and their savings taken by inflation, let us offer new hope for a stable economy. we must meet
. you have helped us to answer the question whether washington is empty in august and the answer is, no, we thank you all for being here with us today for this joint newsmaker and book and author committee event. i am chair of the newsmaker committee and also washington correspondent for workforce management, a business magazine published by crane publications. and the book and author committee chair is andrew schneider and andrew is over here to my right, he's an associate editor at kipling washington editors. this morning we're going to explore the privatization of intelligence, a topic whose news peg was sharpened to my delight by today's front page stories on the c.i.a. outsourcing 2004 operations designed to kill al qaeda leaders. we have an outstanding panel to delve into this topic. general hayden to my left, he's a retired four-star air force general who served as the director for the national security agency from 1999 to 2005, and director of the c.i.a. from 2006 to 2009. to my right, my immediate right, is another former bush administration official michael chertoff who was se
guest: the koppers have a long history here in the u.s. and they can be in different forms. they can be owned by the members themselves and they use their strength as a group to purchase goods or services and the cooperatives of that would be formed across the united states would act in the very same way as they do today. i informed rural illinois and we are very familiar with cooperatives as individuals come together as groups. americans think of themselves as the rugged individualists, but actually, we join groups all the time. and the cooperatives give the power of groups to the individual. i think that it can bring competition to the health care sector. we need greater competition. but we need greater choices for individuals. and that is what i think cooperative's done correctly will do. a cartel, on the other hand, is controlled by the suppliers and their monopolistic -- and they are monopolistic and they do not serve to enhance competition. cartels killed competition. we ought to be careful about the real language that is being used. kecoughtahost: it sounds like ot c
caused many of us to question that while households are tightening their budgets, federal agencies continue to report profit two companies if it were expected and not earned. it is if one had a restaurant and you go to it as a customer. it is if you are a waiter or waitress and charged them with items that you did not ask for. some agencies are giving contractors or were just as poorly, pretty much everything those contractors could want. . . that said, i do believe there can be some possible solutions and some that we may want to pursue. after it was exposed that department of defense contractors were getting reword fees, this estimated in foreign $50 million in savings in the programs were the rollover practice was once used. perhaps, this should be extended to other agencies. i've personally do not see the object of incentivizing worked contractors if we do not know whether they work. in some cases, they do not know what they want out of the contractors that they do business with, let alone how the performance should be delivered. schedules and put -- skills and -- they may be u
're on medicare, so maybe i shouldn't use you as a specific example. let's go to how do we guarantee that people get healthcare? what we might be able to do is guarantee that you have access to healthcare insurance, but it goes back to what was stated by dr. farr earlier that if you don't have doctors that are seeing these individuals, if they're not going to take medicare, they're not going to be on the government plan, we have given you the bus ticket without the bus. we have guaranteed access, if you will, because we said, ok, well, you now have insurance but if we haven't fixed the other side of it, which is getting you in the door to see a provider to help you, how have we helped you so, again, to go back to building a system of reform on a system that has failed us here in alaska with medicare, and it goes back to the reimbursement issue, it's just not going to work. we won't be able to guarantee you healthcare. we might be able to guarantee you the card that says you can get there but if you're living in the wrong spot -- >> the gentleman in the second row with the brown shirt and glasses
in other words, dealing with one problem here as opposed to 100 problems is what you are asking us to do. >> please. >> thank you for coming. my question would be, what could you do to get the government out of our lives and let us use our god-given ability and talent to make things better for everyone. >> i suppose the easiest answer would be just to vote no on new programs. i think there are a lot of things out there already this year than to have the pill. .. i have found it easier to stop -- to cause problems for not getting larger and not establishing new problems and i found it to do with older programs. programs. being a person wants to limit government, i found the best way to do it was through the taxing policy. if you limit the money coming into the federal treasury, you will limit what can be spent to some extent. you are still having overspending. i do not by the principal that an increase the dollar of taxes is a dollar reduction in expenditures -- in the deficit. a dollar increase in taxes does not result in a dollar decrease in deficits. what it results in is probabl
to weak people that they convinced to commit suicide, but at the end of the day, do they accept us as a jewish state proof. -- as a jewish state? . >> in on the complex -- armed conflicts, that our strategies and also psychological operations. in the counter risen efforts -- counter-terrorism efforts, and it may be an abstract question that requires an abstract answer, is there a viable strategy or tactical approach to the use of psychological the terence to deter -- psychological deterrence to deter the actions of terrorists? it is easy to think about the physical deterrents and protections of borders and so forth. how liable is psychological deterrence -- how viable is psychological deterrent to that that of nuclear and biological materials and so forth, and also to be armed aggressors? >> bill on the panel would like to deal with that? -- who on the panel would like to deal with that? >> on mondays, wednesdays, and friday's i am an optimist and believe that there are solutions to problems. one tuesdays and thursdays i am not an optimist, or in the words of mark twain, i am an op
, or more months at a time. economists worry that the shock of the financial crisis may have driven u.s. into a period of permanently high unemployment. monticello, arizona, kathy. caller: good morning. i am calling in on the unemployment figures and i understand that the congress is looking at another extension for people. i have been underemployed and unemployed for the three years since october 1. i was a victim of downsizing in our state where the governor signed a billion-dollar contract with ibm to downsize local social service agencies. part of my concern is that the unemployment numbers that you get, people do not understand that that is based on the people drawing benefits. whereas people who no longer have an unemployment benefits, those people are not even popping up in the numbers. host: we appreciate all your calls this morning. we will be back at 7:00 eastern time tomorrow morning. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] . >> he has been in the iraqi parliament since 2005. he is the first deputy speak
committees. that never would have occurred to us. i don't think anybody spent 10 minutes thinking about welfare and health care proposals at the same time to these committees. that is exactly what this administration has done and maybe we will really learn something here. . >> we were in an unusual situation. democrats have not been in the white house and 12 years. almost no one one worked in the white house. we had very little idea. they told us a little bit about how this works. they do not know how i white house works. he can see a dramatic difference on how the obama administration hit the ground running. they have done it before. i imagine that most campaign workers feel the same anxiety the moment that their candidate wins and realize that now you have to share this thing with everybody else. yet to do with a party that was on helpful or oppose what you are trying to do. now they were in as good of a position to get an influential role in the administration as you waere. you actually believe in the guy you just elected. it is difficult and important for a white house to figure out
to do that because of the mess the majority created of the conferenced bill and i use that term loosely as most of the funding levels and programs were determined not in a conference but by the house leadership and by my chairman. but when it came to counting votes, the leadership and the chairman had to do some dancing and started loading up the war supplemental with extraneous and unrelated items on -- all of which needed to get more votes. cash for clunkers was one of those items. my colleagues in the senate, senator feinstein in particular and senator collins, had some serious concerns with the house bill. senator feinstein tried to negotiate some changes to improve the program, but was rebuffed, as i understand it, by my chairman. basically they were told it was his way or the highway. here we are today, not one hearing on the cash for clunkers program in the appropriations committee, not one hearing on the needs of the program prior to receiving funds, no one hearing on how the first $1 billion has been spent, not one hearing on how much money the program will need to get through
. >> and welcome to the white house. [cheering] >> i am glad all of you could be with us today as we honor the newest member of our highest court, who i'm proud to address for the very first time as justice sonia sotomayor. [cheers and applause] >> we are also honored to be joined by justice sotomayor's new colleagues. we have justice ginsburg, who is here, as well as justice steve stevens. [applause] >> so i just want to thank both justice stevens and justice ginsburg, not only for being here today but for your extraordinary service on the court. and i know you'll be giving justice sotomayor some good ti tips. [laughter] >> i also want to thank everyone who's worked so hard to bring to us this day. i want to thank especially our judiciary committee chairman, senator patrick leahy. [applause] >> as well as our senate majority leader, harry reid, for their outstanding work to -- [applause] >> for their outstanding work to complete this process before the august recess. i want to thank senator schumer, senator gillibrand, both of whom are justice sotomayor's home state senators, for their ex
and human misery as weapons against the inflation. let us pledge that employment will be the first priority of our economic policy. . across the generations. it is the glory and the greatness of our tradition to speak for those who have no voice, to remember those who are forgotten, to respond to the frustrations and fulfill the aspirations of all americans seeking a better life in a better land. we dare not forsake that tradition. we cannot let the great purposes of the democratic party become the bygone passages of history. we must not permit the republicans to seize and run on the slogans of prosperity. we heard the orators at their convention all trying to talk like democrats. they proved that even republican nominees can quote franklin roosevelt to their own purpose. the grand old party thinks it has found a great new trick, but 40 years ago an earlier generation of republicans attempted the same trick. and franklin roosevelt himself replied, "most republican leaders have bitterly fought and blocked the forward surge of average men and women in their pursuit of happiness. let
of this great service, the happy thought emerged to use part of these letters to show the warm and paternal spirit of pope benedict xvi. most holy father, i ask the benefits -- president obama to personally handle this letter to you. as a man of deep faith himself, he understands how important my roman catholic faith is to me and i am so deeply grateful to him. i hope this letter and find you in good health. i pray that you have all of god's blessings as you leave your church and inspire our world during these challenging times. i am writing with deep humility to ask that you pray fit -- that you pray for me as my own health declines. i was diagnosed with brain cancer more than a year ago. although i continue treatment, the disease is taking its toll on me. i am 77 years old and preparing for the next passage of life. i have been blessed to be a part of a wonderful onfamily. my parents kept their catholic faith in the center of their lives. it has sustained and nurtured and provided solace to meet in my darkest hours. i know that i have been an imperfect human being, but with the help of my
their coverage over. but leave us alone, that is all that we would ask. will you leave us alone. [applause] i would like to ask you if you will commit to working on those problems rather than throwing everything into turmoil. >> what -- would i commit to working on those problems and throwing everything into turmoil, that is a general statement that i can agree with, i will stay in touch and i will be back next year. and if i am reelected i will be back the year after that. who has no. 7? >> thank you for coming, arlen specter. >> let me answer more fully. i do not want to see tomorrow, we want to have a sense of an answer. we have a series of problems. i want to take them up one by one. we want to figure out what the problem is, and what is the way that we should deal with them in a democracy. >> [inaudible] >> i am not familiar with 3400, let me move on. >> i am a republican, but i am a conservative. i do not believe this is just about health care. it is not about tarp, left and right. this is about the systematic dismantling of this country. dismantling of this country. 'm only 35 years ol
anthems of canada and the united states, music that reminds us of our history, our traditions, our struggles, and our victories. will you please rise? ♪ ["o canada" playing] ["star-spangled banner" playing] thank you. please be seated. as we begin today, i am especially honored to be here and see for this year's air safety program -- yhour mc for this year's a safety program. we have but to get all the representatives of safety, security, jumpseat, and pilot assistance. and has been quite an undertaking. i am grateful for all the long and hard work of those who made it possible. it is my pleasure to introduce the committee chairs whose efforts led to this historic week. on my far right, united capt. rory kay. on my far left, first officer rich obert. i might direct left, national security committee chair robert powers. there are two more individuals on stage for us to welcome. first, the president of the airline pilots association, captain john prater, and the " honorable capt. randy that it -- babbitt. he is no. 1 in the faa. you get a pilots said it, it is it his signature on y
acclaim. in front of black and white audiences struggle to write the nation's moral compass, he brought us the common tragedy of racism, reconciliation, and the joys of everyday life. the man would near the character and would advance the nation's dialogue on race and respect. chita rivera. from stage to screen, she has captured america's imagination with their magnetic presence and radiant voice. over a career that has spanned a half century, she has received numerous accolades for her performances including two tony awards, six nominations, and the kennedy center honors award. as perilous as any to an open would west side story" -- she is broken traditions and inspired women to follow in her footsteps. we honor her for her lifetime of achievement as one of america's great artists. mary robinson. for mary robinson, the fight to end discrimination and suffering is an urgent moral imperative. she has been a trail blazing crusader for women's rights in ireland and an advocate for equality and human rights around the world. whether courageously visiting poverty stricken regions were working t
people saying, how can we afford this right now? we've got to use our resources for the deficit. first, i want everyone to understand the source of our deficit, because if you do not understand that, argument will not make sense. when i walked into the white house, i have people waiting for me at the door, a 1.3 trillion dollar deficit. 1.3 trillion dollars. i say that -- this was not -- and this is not, by the way, entirely the previous administration's fault. the financial crisis was so bad that revenue plummeted and all of this money was spent in making sure that the banking system did not completely collapsed. so all of the actions that have been taken just spite the deficit. but the problem actually is not that -- the extraordinary steps we've taken over last one or two years. the real problem is much longer. even if we had no fiscal crisis whatsoever, we have a structural deficit, we are spending more money than we're taking in, we have been doing it for the last eight years. when we passed the prescription drug benefit for medicare by a republican congress, they did not pay for it.
york university. good morning. >> good morning. >> host: thank you for being with us. you have tracked the obama administration, their changeover in power and how things are going, give us a sense of how the public is feeling about president obama right now. >> well, it has been a bad 100 days for the obama administration. pretty upbeat and lots of things happening the first 100 days. really rolling forward with the stimulus package and so forth, but the second 100 days have been tough. his approval ratings are down. there's bitter, emerging fight over healthcare, obviously. i think that in many ways he's given too much power to the house and the senate. too much hour to nancy pelosi, speaker of of the house, and harry reid, the senate majority leader, to push legislation forward. he hasn't exerted the powers of the presidency really to push this debate forward on a plan that he favors. he's quite equivocal on healthcare from week to week. do we require a government option? do we not? he's flip-flopped on that issue. this is a pretty tough time for him and unless he comes out of the au
did that. -- i would rather you not to do that. those costs for everyone who is using emergency care for their primary care, those costs are being adored by the 85% of us who actually already have health insurance. they would pay about $150 or so for a health-care provider to get $20 with the medication so that i did not have to use the emergency room as the primary health-care provider. i was that no one else did have that kind of experience that i have had. there are probably many more things that i could cover right now, but i know that my staff is giving me a signal of 1 minute. i have exhausted more than that. what i would like to do now is have the opportunity to take your questions. the way the we are going to handle questions is that these microphones are right here. you can line up behind the microphones to ask a question. out of respect for the people and everybody in the room, it will be great if you use your one minute for your question otherwise it does not matter. maker statement or question. you are just going to get one minute to do it. as you can see, a lot of people
-- on that note. i disagree for the simple reason that this country has not been so nice to many of us. now, i am black. another history a little better than the gentleman who called earlier. he is not so nice. we thank god for a family like the kennedys because what has come into fruition has been four thinks -- we have a black president, we had a black governor -- these are initiatives of a good family that god uses. see, we think we're got and have more power than guide. hear this from people who are negative, people who think they really know god, but one good thing is that along with being liberal is that you to whom much is given, much is required. now in the bible all those who are blessed are supposed to give and help. host: mm-hmm. caller: in the jewish religion, the favorites of god, those who gave gave, those were blessed blessed. the remnant of those who are supposed to keep it in carrying it on, so we find a remnant in the kennedy family. host: thanks for the call. more opinion from inside "the washington post." only gerald ford and bill clinton have had worse ratings after seven mon
can send us a message by twitter. here is the front page above the fold in "the washington post" -- as a ben bernanke is reappointed, the announcement will come this morning from an elementary school. here is what mr. obama will say "as an expert on the causes of the great depression i'm sure that ben never imagined he would be part of the team responsible for preventing another." he purged the collapse with calm and wisdom with bold action and thinking outside the box. -- he approached that collapsed. these reporters indicate that mr. obama's decision had become the subject of growing speculation. in washington policy circles the president called the fed chairman to the oval office this past wednesday to offer him another four-year term. mr. ben bernanke then flew off to wyoming where he gave the defense of his controversial policies. one of the points, is that appointing a democrat such as janet yellen, alan blinder, would have been popular with many democrats, but a move by mr. obama to install his own person at the fed might have rattled markets and unsettled the foreign inv
invention. we have not used that word before. what is the role of the federal government before, during, and after these events? is additional authority needed to address response and recovery from these events? we cannot sit by and merely hope that out size to disasters such as hurricane katrina and 9/11 will never occur again. our obligation to the public requires investigation by the subcommittee to prepare us for the possibility of these contingencies. hese contingencies. wrecking katrina make landfall august 29th 2005 and prove to be the most costly natural disaster in american history. on congress and particularly the subcommittee have spent the nearly four years since katrina looking at the action of the federal current as well as state and local governments, voluntary agencies as citizens themselves from response to recovery. which continues to this day. on the golf course -- on the gulf coast. today's hearing focuses on next that the. of what it did we learn from hurricane katrina as well as other disasters in the united states and the air around the world practice concerning w
water, using up to two dozen times more energy. over the past several years, a lot of water has been recalled due to contamination by arsenic, cleaning compounds, and bacteria. consumers may not realize that many of the regulations apply to municipalities for tap water, and do not apply to facilities for bottled water. i would like to put up a chart outlining some of these differences. for example, municipal suppliers are required to tell consumers within 24 hours if they find dangerous contaminants that exceed federal levels, but this requirement does not apply to bottled water. certified laboratories must be used for tap waters, but of all water has no similar requirement. and the contamination found, the local contamination, and potential health defects. all water distributors are required to provide a report. instead, they relied on limited information found on labels and in some cases on company websites. . . >> another company states the clinical tests at hospitals several cities demonstrate improvements in the health of patients in certain disorders mountain valley water. anot
in the u.s.. >> this week on "the communicators, " david cohen joins us. thank you for being with us today. i want to start with the fact that there is pretty much a brand new fcc on the horizon. a couple of new members and chairman coming on line shortly. what are your feelings about the new fcc and the old fcc? >> it is easier to talk about the new fcc. i think all of the regulated industries under the jurisdiction of the fcc are full of high hopes for this commission. it is more than what we see in spring training every year where you have high hopes for the team, no matter where they may have finished the year before. i think this commission it is incredibly well qualified. you could say that julius is the most qualified and prepared person ever to be named chairman of the fcc, with his business background, his previous experience, his broad interests in telecommunications policy, we think he is going to be an outstanding chairman. surly from his early comments, focused on critical priority areas that we share, in particular the adoption of broadband in america to help make the united
of intelligence, nuclear weapons, our diplomacy, a close alliance with the u.s. will remain indispensable to the united kingdom. we have also imparted a frank message when needed. in my first speech as shadow foreign secretary in washington in 2006, i argue that in standing up for the rule of law, we must be careful not to imply methods that undermine it, and the reports of prisoner abuse leading to the torture of suspects it resulted in a loss of good will to america. the conservative party fully supports the foreign policy initiatives so far enacted by the obama administration. we are ready to work with our counterparts in washington. central to that work and the single most urgent priority in foreign policy when we come to government would be the american british and wider nato commitment in afghanistan. the conservative party supports the deployment of our armed forces in afghanistan. let me be clear that we are not in afghanistan to, for that country, but to bring about a situation where afghans can provide for their own security and livelihoods of not present a danger to the rest of
these days. what is happening? . u.s. steel workers union in a conference call. he claimed that pittsburgh has snagged these big events because of its excellent record in labor and business relations, public/private partnerships -- they went back over the whole they went back over the whole story of our renaissance that 1950's and said it has all led up to today. frankly, there are probably other reasons why we got picked to be the site of the g-20 summit. i still have not figured the not yet, but i am assuming that we are attractive because we are perceived as a green city. we have a convention center which i believe was the first leed-certified convention center in the world. many buildings around town have been greened in that regard, so they are impressed by those efforts by arrest belt city to raise its environmental profile. also, i think barack obama has some pretty fond memories of pittsburgh. in the pennsylvania primary he spent a lot of time here last spring in the state and came to the city a few times. and also we do have a fairly strong labor presence here. i'm just speculatin
- based forms of fuel that is killing us and telling the resources we need to survive. last summer when gas prices were so expensive, people were screaming to, isn't it terrible. it is tough to live without gasoline but a lot harder to live without water, three days, that is it. i think you bring up a great point in terms of realizing the true cost of the exploitation of those kinds of resources. host: wisconsin on our independent line. caller: first, i want to thank you for c-span. i want to thank the two young people for being on the air. it is so important. i don't remember if it was discovery, national geographic or the history channel but they showed a program where countries -- several countries in the world where they are playing with our weather and putting some kind of gas pump up into the ozone layer and it is affecting the way in that gulf stream patterns and other patterns, and it is influencing -- excuse me -- influencing our weather. and also, why can't governments all over the world outlaw plastic? it would create jobs and get rid of all of this crap all of our water? hos
went up to him and said would you like to go sailing with us today, and the poor kid said yeah, i'd like to. he shanghaied him. we took him. just like him, he took him and me and off to the races. from that point on, all i are remember is ted yelling, yelling, yelling, about me to get up on the right side front of the boat or the left side and he always claims that when i was to rotate with the other little guy that i said you heard him, get up there, and of course, it was really my turn to go up, so anyway, somehow this race was mercifully over. i distance see anything except this cold water coming pouring on me, sunburned, t-shirt, i mean, it was a nightmare. i didn't even see any other boats, but we kept going around and around, so finally, finally, finally this thing was mercifully over, and ted seemed satisfied. i had no idea. probably i was satisfied. i lived through it, but i looked out and it was like a mirage. here is this great big yacht and its was the honey fits. ted wanted to surprise me. we know how much fun ted has making his friends uncomfortable at times, but he h
at to get us going. the first is from brett green who writes for the denver post.com under the title of a better america immersed from woodstock. he writes woodstock means little until you place it in the larger context of the society unravelling around the young adults. from their parents generation, they had absorbed rich idealism for social and economic justice. the piece by brett green and author in denver goes on to say, it was an interlude arriving in the context of more social and political upheaval than most americans have witnessed. it was a chaotic but peaceful interlude to a forthcoming breakdown between government and the governed when combined, it would end an unpopular war. i want to talk for the first half-hour, your thoughts, did a better america emerge from woodstock. the numbers ... twitter address is cspanwj. if you have called us in the last 30 days, send your comment via e-mail or twitter and give others a chance. >> what was it about the gathering, this carnival, this music festival that influenced your political evolution and did a better america emerge from wo
. composed of people that primarily are on twitter and facebook or people that use online organizing techniques to organize their community around some kind of issue. host: you are meeting at the the david lawrence convention center in pittsburgh. . >> that basically decide if they want to follow us around. 9÷they are trying to grab onto what we are doing, regardless of which city is in. host: c-span has a presence at both conferences. we will be covering today and tomorrow, some of the panels that are taking place, including a conversation with congressman suspect and arlen specter who will be speaking at the event with the former dnc chairman howard dean. where do you see the netroots movement going into next three- five years? guest: what will happen is that the past seven or so, we have worked on the electric-politics. it has gotten pretty sophisticated. there has been signs among activists and victories and money raised on line. you'll start seeing people translate that into techniques that are effective for governments. getting things like health care passed, getting the cat a
of us. in the private insurance market when somebody who is not on medicare but doesn't have health insurance shows up at the hospital and the hospital gets the doctor and they treat the patient and they have to do big surgery, you think the hospital just swallows all that cost? they and the insurance companies pass it on. it's estimated that in the private insurance market individuals pay over on average $1,100 a year for all the people who are not insured in the system and pay for it in a very inefficient way because they are not getting the preventive care up front. they have to wait until the problem gets worse because they can't go to the doctor's office because what does the doctor office say when you call them up. what's your insurance number? i don't have one so it gets worse and worse and worse and they show up at the hospital, much more expensive. who pays for it, all of us through our insurance and medicare through the system so we're saying people have to shoulder that responsibility now, but you can't say to somebody who earns $25,000 a year that you've got to pick up t
will be flown to washington following a brief ceremony at the steps at the u.s. capitol, burial at arlington national cemetery at 5:30 p.m. eastern. all of those of dense our live at c-span. an interview with a group of reporters from the "boston globe," who wrote the book about the rise and fall of ted kennedy. that is at 8:00 a.m. on saturday on c-span2. just a reminder about some of our "washington journal" program next week. we are broadcasting live from virginia hospital center in arlington. we will examine the health care system from the perspective of doctors. they will provide context to the health-care debate. that is next monday through wednesday on "washington journal." we will take you down to a health care town hall meeting with donna edwards of maryland. she is a member of the congressional progressive caucus, many of whom said they will not vote for a health-care bill without a public option. this took place in germantown. it is about 1.5 hours. [applause] >> excellent. first of all, an introduction because i know some of you but i don't know all of you. i am donna edwards. i
. it is reasonable to declare that the worst of the crisis is behind us and that the first signs of global growth have appeared. back to the phone for the independent. >> ben bernanke and the bankers were optimistic. wondering why anyone would believe. unemployment rising. they did nothing good in sight other than inflation. turn down your television or radio. >> ok. there you go. >> ok. i'm here. ok. what i would like to say is i feel like the economy is doing great. president obama is basically making things better for more people. the republicans to say it was basically stag nent for the top 1% of society. theyer saying we'll sacrifice many for the sak of the economy such as the big corporations. now, you are seeing -- if you look at the surveys and things people are talking about votes. i'm optimistic myself. i'm going to open up a business. it has been owned and ran by people who were running on credit. things are bottoming out and flipping over. this is a reason why a lot of moin or thes and different type of people they are dealing their own businesses and empowering themselves. jo der rem
. 202-737-0002 for democrats. we also have a line for independents, and send us a tweed. inside "usa today" the health- care battle bubbling over in town hall forums across the nation this month, shifting to tv screens. if you go to the website politico.com, a $12 million edged campaign committee latest wave of ads in support of the president's plan. mike allen joins us. can you explain what this is all about. guest: the $12 million buy, which is the first of tens of millions of dollars of money going out in support of the president's plant is an effort by white house allies to counter all the great coverage we have been seeing on c-span and elsewhere of these raucous town halls. as you know, this is the reversal of the landscape that president clinton faced back in 1993 when the air waves were very much dominated by the opposition. >> this is coming -- host: this is coming at the same time as the net routes meeting in michigan, and "usa to the" is pinning it $57 million in health-care advertising. guest: it is like a presidential campaign if you are in ohio you will see more of the
in health care centers so that we can deal with the needs of people today not using primary care facilities. but you are right. the bill will not be implemented overnight. it will take several years for it to be fully implemented. we have to have primary-care physicians in place before we have these requirements go into place. host: last question, a different topic the senate will vote on expanding the cash for clunkers program. how will you vote? guest: i will vote for it. it has been more successful than many of us thought. the milage increase has gone up 10 miles per gallon on new cars. it is beating feel efficiency and new cars by 20%. we are getting off the roads these cars and trucks, mainly trucks, that are very inefficient, and getting a much more efficient automobiles, and helping our economy and creating jobs, which a stimulus should do. it is good news. host: thank you for being here. we will take you live to capitol hill. this committee hearing is the senate, and security -- senate homeland security and government affairs committee. it is chaired by tom carper. it is on the heal
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